The Society of Clinical Perfusion Scientists of Great Britain and Ireland and The College of Clinical Perfusion Scientists of Great Britain and Ireland
What is the College

What is the College


Clinical perfusion scientists (CPSs) should be registered with the College to practise in Great Britain and Ireland.  In its document Guidance on Employment of Perfusionists in the NHS, Ref. No HRD ER4, dated 20th December 1999, regarding good practice in the employment of Clinical Perfusionists in the NHS, the Department of Health recommended that employment of clinical perfusion scientists for clinical practice in the NHS be limited to those accredited by the Society of Clinical Perfusion Scientists.  Only accredited CPSs can be registered with the College.

The College possesses powers designed to maintain the high standards the public has a right to expect of clinical perfusion scientists (CPSs).

The public trusts CPSs to set and monitor their own professional standards.  Patients undergoing major surgery have a right to expect treatment from competent and appropriately qualified staff; in return clinical perfusion scientists must give their patients high-quality care.  Where any clinical perfusion scientist fails to meet those standards, we act to protect patients from harm - if necessary, by striking the clinical perfusion scientist off the voluntary register and notifying their employer.

We are a charity, registration number 293754, whose purpose is the protection, promotion and maintenance of the health and safety of patients undergoing a wide range of cardiac and related procedures.

The full Council meets 4-6 times a year, but the majority of our work is done in sub-committees meeting throughout the year.

How are we made up?

We have 14 members:

•    4 medical practitioners (2 anaesthetists, 2 surgeons) nominated by their professional associations

•    8 perfusionists nominated by the Society of Clinical Perfusion Scientists (SCPS)

•    the Registrar of the SCPS

•    1 academic clinician

CPSs must be registered with the College to practise in Great Britain and Ireland.  To register with us, they must have a recognised perfusion qualification.  All clinical perfusion scientists must demonstrate their continuing fitness to practise in order to remain registered - we call this process re-registration.

The College register shows who is properly qualified to practise in GB and Ireland.  Containing 100% of the more than 380 qualified and trainee clinical perfusion scientists, it's at the heart of our work.  We hold it on computer and update it regularly.
 

The College’s Disciplinary Functions


Standards of Practice

Clinical Perfusion Scientists are autonomous and professional practitioners who are required to behave in a responsible and professional manner.  Patients undergoing major surgery have a right to expect treatment from competent and appropriately qualified staff.  The College sets standards for conduct, behaviour and competence of all aspects of work that are worthy of the term professional.

The College possesses powers designed to maintain these high standards that the public and more specifically the patient has a right to expect of clinical perfusion scientists (CPSs).

The public trusts CPSs to set and monitor their own professional standards; in return, clinical perfusion scientists must give their patients high-quality care.  Where any CPS fails to meet those standards, the College’s Disciplinary Procedures act to protect patients from harm - if necessary, by striking the clinical perfusion scientist off the register.

The Investigating and Professional Practice Committees

The College has two committees to investigate and hear disciplinary cases.  Both committees are independent of each other and the Council.  Cases are referred following notification of police proceedings against a CPS or when a formal complaint is made.

Investigation Committee

Every complaint that the College receives about a CPS must be carefully considered. The Investigation Committee assesses whether cases should be forwarded to the Professional Practice Committee (PPC) for a formal hearing.

The Professional Practice Committee

The PPC and its procedures exist to protect patients from dysfunctional CPSs and where it is consistent with patient safety, to enable such CPSs to remedy their deficiencies.

The PPC intervenes if a CPS is convicted of a serious criminal offence or if information about a CPS’s conduct, performance or health indicates that he/she may be unfit to practice.

Under its fitness to practice powers the PPC acts in circumstances of:

1.    Serious professional misconduct
2.    Serious impairment due to health grounds
3.    Seriously deficient performance

In making it’s judgements the PPC will take into account not only its duty to protect the public but also the public interest, which includes:

•    Preserving public trust in the profession
•    Registering disapproval of unprofessional conduct to the profession and the public
•    Maintaining high standards of conduct

Disciplinary Proceedings

At a formal hearing, where the basic principles of the courthouse are applied, the PPC will decide whether, from the evidence presented to it, the conduct of which the CPS has been accused took place, and if it did, it renders him/her unfit to be registered.  The hearings are fairly conducted and both sides are given equal opportunity to present their case.

After hearing all the evidence the PPC decides whether to find the CPS guilty or not guilty of

1.    Serious professional misconduct
2.    Serious impairment due to health grounds
3.    Seriously deficient performance

If found guilty, the PPC recommends which course of action should be taken against the CPS including:

•    Issuing a warning

•    Removing the CPS’s name from the register but indicating that it would consider re-admission to the register after a set period, provided proof of good conduct / remedial action / re-training were received

•    Erasing the CPS’s name from the register.

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